Goose Gullett

Goose Gullett

(Pole) The Goose Gullet bean is a historical variety of Acadian origins. According to Hope Seeds, “The Acadians deported from the Bay of Fundy purposely grounded their ships along the shores of Clare County & survivors hid deep in the woods, living with the Mi’kmaq” 9 The Acadians found this bean “in the gullet of a downed goose” and went on to plant and save its seeds. 9

Days to Maturity: 120 days

HIstory

The Goose Gullet bean is a historical variety of Acadian origins. It is well described by the words of the PEI Seed Alliance as “a true Acadian legend”. 1

l’Acadie (Acadia) was a French settlement in Canada comprised of the maritime provinces “Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island (formerly Ile St. Jean), New Brunswick, a part of lower Canada (Québec Province), and a part of eastern Maine”. 2 The settlement was initially established in 1605 with the successful Port-Royal on the Bay of Fundy. 3 The name Acadie (Acadia) is thought to be derived from the Greek ‘Acadia’ meaning “rural contentment”. 4 It is often construed by historians to refer to “fertile land, or rich pastures”. 4 This is due to the Acadian use of the traditional French farming practices of dyking and forming sluices to promote drainage in the rich but wet land they settled. 5

The historic references of the Goose Gullet bean are few, however its origins coincide with the “le Grand Dérangement” or “Expulsion of 1755”. In 1755 the Acadians “offered to forfeit their guns”, but,

“[..] refuse[d] to sign an oath of allegiance to Britain that would make them loyal to the Crown instead of being “French neutrals.”” 7

The British decided July 28 and received orders August 11, 1755 to respond with a mass deportation of the Acadians. The historical event, often cited as “Expulsion of 1755” in English and “le Grand Dérangement” in French, started with the ambush of 3 PM on September 5, 1755 at the Catholic Church in Grand-Pré, Nova Scotia. 2, 8 Cascading from this event, the British gathered Acadian colonies and forcibly scattered the people across North America. Select groups were deported as prisoners of war to concentration camps in England. The empty land was recolonized by British colonists.

According to Hope Seeds, “The Acadians deported from the Bay of Fundy purposely grounded their ships along the shores of Clare County & survivors hid deep in the woods, living with the Mi’kmaq” 9 The Acadians found this bean “in the gullet of a downed goose” and went on to plant and save its seeds. 9